Ethnic Residential Segregation and Assimilation in British Towns and Cities: a Comparison of those claiming Single and Du-al Ethnic Identities

Authors

  • Ron Johnston School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol
  • Michael Poulsen Department of Human Geography, Macquarie University
  • James Forrest Department of Human Geography, Macquarie University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33182/ml.v3i1.28

Keywords:

ethnic identity, residential segregation, assimilation

Abstract

There is considerable public debate over the degree of residential segregation of members of ethnic minority groups in British urban areas. Some claim that this is increasing, others that with economic and social assimilation members of those minority groups are increasingly moving away from the areas of initial concentration. The implication is that the more assimilated are also the least segregated. To test whether this is the case, data from the 2001 British census are used to explore whether those who claim a mixed or dual ethnic identity – and who are assumed to be more assimilated than those who identify with one of the minority groups only – are less segregated residentially. The evidence overwhelmingly sustains that argument that they are. 

How to Cite

Johnston, R., Poulsen, M., & Forrest, J. (1). Ethnic Residential Segregation and Assimilation in British Towns and Cities: a Comparison of those claiming Single and Du-al Ethnic Identities. Migration Letters, 3(1), 11-30. https://doi.org/10.33182/ml.v3i1.28

Issue

Section

Articles