Bishops, Kings and Leviathan: Nationalism and Integralism in Light of High Church Anglican Political Thought

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33182/ijor.v2i2.1772

Keywords:

nationalism, integralism, Anglicanism, ecclesiology, Richard Hooker, nonjurors

Abstract

This article traces the political thought of high church Anglicans from 1580-1720. Beginning with Richard Hooker, Anglican political thought was shaped by the need to balance competing principles. For high church Anglicans, the monarchy was seen as the institution best positioned to defend this balance against what they saw as the twin threats of "Puritanism and popery." However, high churchmen also began to defend a high view of episcopacy even over against the power of the English government, introducing a tension between royal supremacy and high church Anglicanism with implications for both nationalist and integralist conceptions of the state. This culminated in the nonjurors—Anglican clergy and academics removed from their posts for refusing to swear oaths to William and Mary—defending episcopacy against both the new king and defenders of royal supremacy. The example of high church Anglicans demonstrates some perils of both nationalist and integralist approaches to politics for many religious forms of traditional conservatism.

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Published

2021-12-26

How to Cite

Nolte, A. (2021). Bishops, Kings and Leviathan: Nationalism and Integralism in Light of High Church Anglican Political Thought. International Journal of Religion, 2(2), 115–128. https://doi.org/10.33182/ijor.v2i2.1772